Archive for the ‘Kaushik Ganguly’ Category

shabdo

I have watched Kaushik Ganguly’s SHABDO umpteen numbers of times. I rank this film very highly and feel this is as ground-breaking a work as Ray’s PATHER PANCHALI & Mrinal Sen’s BHUVAN SHOME. The two main protagonists in the film are a dedicated foley artist and a lady doctor, who is trying to diagnose the debilitating condition of the foley artist, where the foley man seems to be lost in his own acoustic world, unable to appreciate and communicate in real world situations. The doctor too is extremely dedicated and the deteriorating situation of her patient affects her tremendously.

The film gives an insight into technicalities and contribution of sound engineers in filmmaking. Ritwik Chakraborty and Churni Ganguly enact the protagonist. The supporting cast includes Victor Bannerjee, Raima Sen, Srijit Mukherjee and others.

Rating: 4 out of 5

drishtikone

DHRISTIKONE – A woman (Rituparna Sengupta) who loses her husband (Kaushik Sen) in a mysterious car accident hires a married lawyer (Praenjit Chaterjee). An adulterous affair ensue … there is intrigue in the plot at multiple levels – in the case the lawyer is fighting for his client and the relationship he gets drawn into. The wife (Churni Ganguly) gradually gets to know about the transgression of her lawyer husband. The other characters like the brother of the deceased (Kaushik Ganguly) , wheel-chair bound (he was in the same car with his brother which met with an accident), and his maid (Dolon Roy) have intrigue written all over the narrative.

The film touches upon issues of familial love and infedility, human greed and the resultant consequences & an irrational need to cling on to the departed. The end is satisfying containing an interesting twist in the tale. Well-directed by Kaushik Ganguly.

Rating: 4 out of 5

 

BISARJAN is a heart-warming film in the sense that it depicts a magnanimous tale of rescue and growing bond between two unlikely protagonists – a Muslim man (Abir Chaterjee) from India and a Hindu widow (Maya Ahson) from Bangladesh. Both the protagonists are from the minority community in their respective countries. With the rise of fundamentalist forces across the two countries, this essentially humane story weaves in issues like loneliness, love and sacrifice, lust and betrayal, and the power of commune to reform individuals.

The filming qualities – of the unfolding of the narrative, the camerawork and the use of background songs are superlative bearing the stamp of a great filmmaker. Like Gautam Ghose’s SHANKACHIL this particular film weaves in sub-texts of Indo-Bangladesh ties across the border areas, though both the films are essentially human tales. The director Kaushik Ganguly acts in a supporting role of the suitor for the widow with elan.

Rating: 4 out of 5

Chaya

A Kaushik Ganguly film is always something to look forward to and rarely does he disappoint. Like Tapan Sinha, he has made films on a wide range of subjects. One of his latest works CHAYA O CHOBI has a stellar cast of Koel Mullick, Abir Chatterjee, Churni Ganguly, Ritwik Chakraborty and provides an absorbing fare.

A UK based documentary filmmaker (Churni Ganguly) ventures into making feature films and takes her entire unit to North Bengal to shoot on location. The story written by the director Kaushik Ganguly unfolds a plot that has elements of a thriller, but is essentially a film about human relationships. It offers an insight into the happenings and hardships of the filmmaking process and the personal lives of the actors. Several twists in the tale keeps one engaged. Koel Mullick and Ritwik Chakraborty are superb and Abir gives good support. Not really among the best works of the director KG, but nonetheless quite watchable. The beauty of North Bengal lends CHAYA O CHOBI a visual quality that has an appealing effect.

Rating: 3.8 out of 5

 

TOKYO CANCELLED

Posted: March 31, 2018 in Books, Kaushik Ganguly

I am currently reading the book TOKYO CANCELLED by Rana Dasgupta. This is his debut novel and from the comments on the cover of the book I discovered that the book has been praised widely, while RD have been likened to a Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Jonathan Safran Foer, masters who can hold the real and the surreal in satisfying equilibrium. This is quite an extra-ordinary feat achieved by such a young writer…

While reading the book two films that I have viewed over the years came to my mind. The first is the Bengali film KHAAD (D:- Kaushik Ganguly) where a group of stranded passengers recount tales from their lives, something that is also central to the narrative of TOKYO CANCELLED. The second is the Christopher Nolan film INCEPTION where there is interplay of dreams and reality and how mind reading can be put to work and profit, something that also appears in the RD book; especially in the second story THE MEMORY EDITOR…Watch this space for more as I progress with this book J

 

Aborto movie poster.jpg

The film ABORTO deals partly with relationships, and also weaves in corporate politics and rivalry into the narrative. In the past we have seen films based around corporates – the Satyajit Ray films SEEMABADDHA & MAHANAGAR & the Madhur Bhandarkar CORPORATE comes to mind. The film doesn’t borrow from the mentioned films and demonstrates the director Arindam Sil’s competency in handling several characters.

The ensemble cast of Tota Ray Chaudhury, Joya Ahsan, Saswata Chatterjee, Reshmi Ghosh, Abir Chatterjee, Pijush Ganguly, Ritwik Chakraborty, Barun Chanda, Arindam Sil & a wonderful cameo by Kaushik Ganguly add to the strength of the film. Some of the characters are weak though. The clicking of clandestine photos of the philandering executive (Tota RC) with his secretary (Reshma G) by the rustic Ritwik Chakraborty which was obviously something the management would have probed further in the light of character assassination of a senior member appeared rather out of place in the scheme of the wily opponent (Saswata C).

An improved script could have truly made this a memorable film.

Rating: 3.9 out of 5

Khad

 

Like its title KHAAD/ THE FALL the film I think is quite a fall from the high standards set by the director himself in his earlier films like SHABDO. The film is directed by Kaushik Ganguly from his own story.

A motley group of characters travelling to a hill station find themselves stranded in a station owing to a strike. Thereafter, they head to their destination in a missionary bus which meets with an accident and tumbles down a deep valley. Surprisingly, no one dies. They have to spend the night beneath as trekking would need 4-5 hours in the least and the daylight would last only a couple of hours…

During the night they make a bonfire and start making confession – a doc (Bharat Kaul) is exposed as unscrupulous, another reveal being an informer, an elderly cancer afflicted lady (Lily Chakraborty) reveal that she was a Muslim who adopted a Hindu name after marriage, and question whether her son Kaushik Ganguly is Hindu/Muslim? … one failed to comprehend what the director tried to convey through all this…The others in the cast includes Tanusree Chakraborty, Kamleshwar Mukhopadhyay and others.

Rating: 2.75 out of 5