Archive for the ‘Gautam Ghose’ Category

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BISARJAN is a heart-warming film in the sense that it depicts a magnanimous tale of rescue and growing bond between two unlikely protagonists – a Muslim man (Abir Chaterjee) from India and a Hindu widow (Maya Ahson) from Bangladesh. Both the protagonists are from the minority community in their respective countries. With the rise of fundamentalist forces across the two countries, this essentially humane story weaves in issues like loneliness, love and sacrifice, lust and betrayal, and the power of commune to reform individuals.

The filming qualities – of the unfolding of the narrative, the camerawork and the use of background songs are superlative bearing the stamp of a great filmmaker. Like Gautam Ghose’s SHANKACHIL this particular film weaves in sub-texts of Indo-Bangladesh ties across the border areas, though both the films are essentially human tales. The director Kaushik Ganguly acts in a supporting role of the suitor for the widow with elan.

Rating: 4 out of 5

 

In the era subsequent to Sen-Ray-Ghatak, Gautam Ghose has emerged as a true inheritor of their rich legacy. His films draw from the influences of these masters but nonetheless speak in a distinct, independent voice. His contemporaries like Aparna Sen, Buddhadeb Dasgupta, Rituparno Ghosh and Sandip Ray and others have distinguished themselves in certain genres and GG, in several ways, have treaded a different path. While the films of Aparna often deal with relationship and loneliness, the films of Rituparno dealt with Tagorean flashbacks and urban relationships, Sandip Ray has stuck to making Feluda films and other stories of his father, while Buddhadeb Dasgupta after a string of political films started his journey of a ‘very personal kind of cinema’ replete with magic realism, surrealism & other devices.

Gautam Ghose has made a long documentary on Satyajit Ray, and the influence of Ray can be seen in the way the strong emphasis on narrative he lays in his works. Making films on performing artistes (Mithun act as a ventriloquist in Gudia, the biopic Moner Manush) had been a recurring feature in the works of Ray (Joy Baba Felunath, Goopy Gane Bagha Byne, Hirak Rajar Deshe, Phatikchand). He also made a sequel on Ray’s ARANYER DIN RATRI as ABAR ARANYE. The deep social commitment of Mrinal Sen runs through in his oeuvre while Partition, a recurring feature in the films of Ghatak, is also seen in the works of GG (Dekha, Shankachil).

The distinct stamp of the filmmaker often surpassing his influences can be seen in the way he combines brilliant photography, good music and socially relevant subjects into a neat, integrated whole. He weaves the unifying vision of Tagore, Lalan Fakir, Kabir, Dara Shikoh and others strongly in the narrative of his recent works (Moner Manush, Shunno Theke Suru). Displacement of indigenous people and loss of tribal knowledge and heritage resonate in Shunno Theke Suru, while lack of basic health care and issues of partition form the backdrop of his most recent work ‘Shankhachil.’

Several award winning documentariesand fourteen feature films later, GG has emerged as a worthy successor to don the mantle of the triumvirate of art cinema.

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Gautam Ghose

Posted: April 2, 2018 in Gautam Ghose

 

Interview of GG in Hindustan Times, 1st April 2018

Ma Bhoomi

Posted: March 24, 2018 in Gautam Ghose, Regional

MA BHOOMI

Ain Rasheed Khan

Posted: May 6, 2017 in Gautam Ghose, Tidbits

GAUTAM GHOSE

Having made his foray into the world of documentary film in 1979, Ain Rasheed Khan a close friend of Gautam Ghose was also the scriptwriter, commentator and interviewer for Ghosh’s film on Ustad Bismillah Khan. Next came his dialogues and script for a documentary on Cancer – SHAM HI TO HAI- and Ghosh then engaged him as the script and dialogue writer for PATANG, which won the National award for Best film in 1994. November 1995 also saw him in London as an additional expert commentary writer for an Indo-British called BEYOND THE HIMALAYAS.

(Src: STATESMAN 22/6/96)

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